FacebookGoogle PlusInstagramLinkedInTwitter
Presented by State Library Victoria

Review of the December Lit Club book, Everything Everywhere Everyone

Hey fellow readers,

And welcome to, I guess the first proper post(aside from Inky announcing the start of it, obviously) of December’s Lit Club! Here are some thoughts and opinions that I had of the book. Feel free to disagree.

3.75 🌟 rounded up to 4🌟.

Everywhere, Everything, Everyone is a young-adult dystopian novel by Australian author Katy Warner and this is the book for this month’s(December) Lit Club. I really enjoyed this book, though I do have some few points to, you know, point out that I did not like as much as I would have wanted to. If I am being truthfully honest, it almost feels like a standard YA dystopian novel without a whole lot that necessarily sets it apart from many other dystopian novels.Picture of the Berlin Wall

Essentially, there is a ruthless dictator like character that wants to control the population through banning all sense of freedom, such as media, books, art, culture, etc. They do this to obviously brainwash the people into thinking that they are indeed safe and also promising that everything is getting better and better, when things are evidently not improving, despite what the government might say. It is set in Australia I believe, though I don’t think it mentions what city it is in, though I feel like it may be Canberra due to references to Parliament House but that is merely an educated guess and I am probably wrong.

It is told in first person perspective and follows the character Santee, who is this sixteen year old girl who lives on a side of the city where certain people are called “threats” which is a term made up by the government to install fear in the populace, whereas the other side, most people are called “good citizens.” It does deal with lots of themes about government, democracy and dictatorship and at how a government slowly rolls out new stuff to control everyone.

The plot does move along pretty quickly and things are always happening, so at no point did it feel like it dragged, and when it did slow down, things picked up pretty quickly again. There are some feel good moments paired alongside painful moments of horror and fear from the characters to show the brutality of the regime.

There is a romance between Santee, our protagonist and Z, whose full name is Zac. Zac for most of the book is basically this perfect dude who can’t go wrong and he is so polite and kind and giving, which made me go, ehh, however, there were also parts that made him feel more human to me when he did let his emotions out to show he was a person rather than this perfect guy for Santee. I did feel that the romance between the two was a bit too quick for my liking. Like, it was not instalove per se, but more hormonal teenagers, which like, yeah? ok, but then also made me feel, wow, they got things moving really quickly. I understand that they have seen each other round for a little while, but there was minimal interaction from what the author gives us, though it worked out in the end so, oh well.

For all of the other characters, there were some I liked, some I disliked and some I appreciated for who they were. Beth, who was the wellbeing person in charge of “calming down” Santee or whatever, while annoying, tried to help her in her own way, which, look, was nice, even though there was nothing inherently wrong with Santee. Mila, who is Z’s younger sister was awesome and so very cute. She was honestly a highlight of the book for me, she was that amazing. Peter I feel like will always be an under appreciated character in the book, but I liked him and thought that his role, while small, was incredibly important to the story. Tash, who is Santee’s bully at school, while having a semi redemption arc was someone I could not really connect to, and even at the end, I still did not like her a whole lot. I found Z’s dad to be pretty cool though, and so was their neighbour. They were two good characters that I enjoyed reading about despite their flaws(it only makes them feel more like people). For the most part, I do not like perfect characters, and these characters all had their only flaws, which I did like, which is why I stated above that Z felt almost too perfect at the start before displaying more of his human side.

And there you go, my thoughts and opinions on December’s Lit Club book, Everywhere, Everything, Everyone. I really liked it, though had a few slight problems with the book and that’s about it. 7.5/10

My next post may be a little bit more controversial as I compare this book with real life things, both present and future, but until write that post, happy reading!

12 comments

inky State Library Victoria

Hang on, aren't you polite and kind and giving ALL THE TIME? Great review - can't wait to read the real life comparisons. Mila was my favourite character.

12th Dec, 19
silene

I agree - Mila was the best character

12th Dec, 19
zitongbooks

In reply to silene

Mila was awesome!

14th Dec, 19
lauraamabel

In reply to zitongbooks

She really was!!

19th Dec, 19
bookwithbane

As soon as the wall came up, I knew it reminded me of the Berlin Wall. Any characters that weren't at the front were semi-underdeveloped from what I've seen so far. Peter, Tash, Diggs and Zac. Beth was helping her because while no one has something wrong with them, there are things to work (e.g anger issues). Awaiting your next post!

13th Dec, 19
zitongbooks

It reminded me of the Berlin Wall too! I hope you enjoy the rest of the book!

14th Dec, 19
silene

I agree. But the further I got into the book the more developed the main characters got - which made things more intriguing and interesting

17th Dec, 19
lauraamabel

In reply to silene

I think that some of my favourite characters were actually the less developed ones. I liked Mila and Santee's family (Astrid especially) and Pip (of course).

19th Dec, 19
sylvs

Oooft I better read it ASAP then!! XD

14th Dec, 19
zitongbooks

I guess you do and I hope you like it! :)

14th Dec, 19
lauraamabel

Yeah, the story does remind me a lot of the Berlin Wall. My mum was there when the wall was demolished. I should ask her to tell me more about it now that I'm older and understand more about history. I also found striking similarities between "The Wall" and Trump's wall. I think that his propaganda about Mexico parallels a lot of the novel. About to read your next post and really looking forward to it.

19th Dec, 19
zitongbooks

Wow! Yeah there are lots of similarities to all sorts of different things in the real world :/

19th Dec, 19